General Fishing tips


Fishing Safely
May 17, 2015

Fishing Safely

The weather Weather has a lot of bearing on water safety, so whether you are fishing from a boat or from land, be aware of the weather forecast and watch for changes. Wind is the single greatest threat to fishing safety. Offshore winds (blowing from land to sea) can occur any time but are most common in winter. They blow up quickly and often violently, and pose most threat to boats, especially those with mechanical problems, inadequate horsepower or marginal sea ability. A disabled boat can be blown kilometres out to sea.......

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All About Bait
May 17, 2015

All About Bait

Fish will response best to bait that is presented as naturally and attractively as possible. It should be a bait that offers no reason for the fish to become suspicious or alarmed and, preferably, one that is a naturally occurring food item in the habitat of the target fish Saltwater baits A fussy fish, and there are many of these, will often baulk at something that seems unnatural in the water, is unfamiliar or stale. A well presented bait freshly procured from the bait grounds where one is fishing works almost every......

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Cooking methods
May 17, 2015

Cooking methods

Fish fall into several categories, each suiting particular cooking methods. The light white-fleshed fish, such as bream, flounder, whiting, john dory, mulloway and ling are all best suited to frying or gentle baking. The darker, oiler fish with a strong flavour, including kingfish, mullet, tuna, gem fish and tailor, are better grilled, poached or braised. Fresh fish flesh is reasonably translucent, becoming opaque or whitish when cooked. At this stage the flesh will flake along the muscle and release a clear juice. Once cooked the fish should be served immediately. remember, the flesh......

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Limit Your Catch
May 17, 2015

Limit Your Catch

A welcome trend has appeared over the last decade or two: anglers are starting to release fish, even where no limits apply or bag limits have not been met. Many anglers now realise that most legal limits are extremely generous. In some countries, limits of just one or two fish per angler per day are now commonplace. While a few pest species need heavy culling by anglers, for the vast majority of species there is a growing realisation that overloaded bags of fish are a loss that waters can no longer withstand.......

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Fishing the Tides
May 17, 2015

Fishing the Tides

Estuary anglers must allow for the reversal every six hours of tidal flow, and alter their fishing spots accordingly. The most productive ends of reefs, structures, channels and gutters reverse with the tide. The sea entrance to an estuary is a good place to fish on a running tide, as fish passing from the estuary to the sea, or vice versa, must use this corridor. As the tide falls, small fish, prawns and crabs leave the shelter of sand flats, weed areas and mangrove roots, and return to the channels, where the......

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Handling Fish
May 17, 2015

Handling Fish

If you plan to return your catch to the water, handle it as little as possible because the slime coating of the fish protects it from disease. If you are intending to eat your catch, your first task is to kill the fish immediately, either by a sharp blow with a blunt instrument (the heel of your knife or a small hammer) between or above the eyes, a knife-stab in the same spot, or by breaking the bridge across the throat and bending the head back. The last process helps to bleed......

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Reading the Water
May 17, 2015

Reading the Water

Inshore, around shallow reefs, headlands and islands, it is easy to recognise areas where fish might be gathered, but out in open water, it is different when it comes to reading the water. Fish will be spread over wide area and their whereabouts must be gauged by guesswork and intuition. Atmosphere conditions, such as light levels, wind and barometric pressure, and factors such as the clarity, turbulence, temperature and oxygen content of the water – all have an influence on fish presence and behaviour, and all of these can affect the availability......

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Mulloway, Trevally and Whiting

Mulloway Some of the mulloway (jewfish) found in bays and estuaries are residents, others are only occasional visitors. They frequent areas around bridges, points, holes and creek mouths, where they hunt or ambush their favoured foods of small fish, prawns or squid. Live or dead baits of these are effective, as are large minnow-style lures. Mulloway are found in estuaries at any time of the year, heir whereabouts being dependent on the presence of prawns, squid and schools of pilchards, mullet and whitebait on which they feed. Trevally Trivially frequent many estuaries, the......

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Bream, Flathead and Snapper

Bream Bream are likely to be found almost anywhere in an estuary or bay, but prefer areas offering a structure and shelter. The three main species are black bream, yellowfin bream and pikey bream. Unlike most other species, bream stay in the estuary over winter and, rather than migrating offshore, they move up the estuary to where fresh water meets salt and spawn there. Flathead Flathead come in more than a dozen forms, but three commonly encountered species are sand flathead, a widespread inshore species; dusky flathead, the most common species in temperate......

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