Reading the Water

April 22, 2015 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

Inshore, around shallow reefs, headlands and islands, it is easy to recognise areas where fish might be gathered, but out in open water, it is different when it comes to reading the water. Fish will be spread over wide area and their whereabouts must be gauged by guesswork and intuition. Atmosphere conditions, such as light levels, wind and barometric pressure, and factors such as the clarity, turbulence, temperature and oxygen content of the water – all have an influence on fish presence and behaviour, and all of these can affect the availability of food and the fish’s willingness to bite. It is also important that you consider the prevailing conditions when deciding which baits and lures to use, and how to go about presenting them.

ocean fishingThe colour of the water indicates temperature changes: warm water appears to be bluish, and colder water has a greener tinge. However, just how warm or cold the water is depends on where you are.

General light levels and the angle at which light falls on the water can also affect fish distribution and the willingness of fish to bite. Many species of fish prefer to feed under the cover of darkness, or at least at half light. Some fish that would not go anywhere near shallow water during the day, can be attracted by the half light of dawn or dusk, or the darkness of night to move into water barely deep enough to cover them, provided the pickings are rich enough to warrant the trouble. Others, in particular the pelagic like tuna and marlin, seem not to be affected by light.

The roughness of the sea not only determines your ability to venture offshore, it also affects general fish behaviour. A moderate degree of wind and wave action is beneficial to fishing, as the associated white water and wind chop allows fish to move about with reduced risk from predators.

Turbulence can also stimulate feeding, as there is often more to eat at such times. Wave action tears food loosed from reefs and rock ledges. Prey species are driven by currents and wind into concentrations, providing an easily harvested food supply. Broken water also offers another prompt to fish activity: the ruptured surface film of the water allows higher than normal levels of oxygen from the atmosphere to be absorbed by the water. This boost in oxygen content both encourages and enables fish to maintain higher levels of sustained effort.

Shakespeare Ugly Stick GX2 Spinning Rod Combo

Shakespeare Ugly Stick GX2 Spinning Rod Combo

Fish that have a high metabolic rate feed almost constantly, and have a correspondingly high level of oxygen demand. Many surface-feeding species must roam extensively to find food; they burn up vast amounts of oxygen just to survive. Such species include mackerel, yellowtail kingfish, marlin, tailor and especially those frenetic speed merchants, the tunas.

Other more sedentary species, such as snapper, bream or mulloway, have generally slower metabolic rates, and less continuous periods of activity. They often browse, rest or draft with the moving water, generally cost to cover and always where they are most comfortable. But when the occasion demands, they can move like lightning, either to feed, to drive off intruders or to flee from danger.

A shift of some kind in the surrounding conditions usually triggers localised reef fish to exert themselves and feed vigorously. It might be a tide change, a flush of warm current, the onset of bumpy weather, a different moon phase or the sudden arrival of an attractive, easily harvested food supply.

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Mulloway, Trevally and Whiting

April 21, 2015 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

Mulloway

Some of the mulloway (jewfish) found in bays and estuaries are residents, others are only occasional visitors. They frequent areas jewfisharound bridges, points, holes and creek mouths, where they hunt or ambush their favoured foods of small fish, prawns or squid. Live or dead baits of these are effective, as are large minnow-style lures. Mulloway are found in estuaries at any time of the year, heir whereabouts being dependent on the presence of prawns, squid and schools of pilchards, mullet and whitebait on which they feed.

Trevally

trevallyTrivially frequent many estuaries, the silver variety being common in temperate zone, and species such as giant, older, gold-spotted and bigeye usually found in warmer areas. Most really will take lures; all will take baits of small fish. Silvers will also take various worms, crustaceans and shellfish. Larger trivially are usually caught offshore.

Whiting

There are some eight common species of whiting; of these the best known are the trumpeter and sand whiting, the yellow-finned whitingwhitening, and the King George whiting. Whiting are a warm weather fish and leave estuaries in the winter.

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Bream, Flathead and Snapper

April 21, 2015 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

Bream

Bream are likely to be found almost anywhere in an estuary or bay, but prefer areas offering a structure and shelter. The three main species breamare black bream, yellowfin bream and pikey bream. Unlike most other species, bream stay in the estuary over winter and, rather than migrating offshore, they move up the estuary to where fresh water meets salt and spawn there.

Flathead

flatheadFlathead come in more than a dozen forms, but three commonly encountered species are sand flathead, a widespread inshore species; dusky flathead, the most common species in temperate estuaries; and tiger flathead, a heavily built version common in cooler areas. In estuaries, flathead favour the edges of sandbanks, scattered patches of weed and any place where the current is deflected into eddies. In bays, they congregate where tidal flows meet, and offshore, they father in depths around 40m – wherever currents combine to form food lanes.

Snapper

Juvenile snapper live in bays and estuaries, while adult fish spend much of their time around offshore reefs. Periodically, however, big Snapperfish do move into sheltered waters, usually in spring and summer, and are reasonably easy to catch.

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A Fishing Lure

July 9, 2011 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

A couple of young boys were fishing at their special pond off the beaten track. All of a sudden, the Game Warden jumped out of the bushes.

Immediately, one of the boys threw his rod down and started running through the woods like a bat out of hell. The Game Warden was hot on his heels.

After about a half mile, the young man stopped and stooped over with his hands on his thighs to catch his breath, so the Game Warden finally caught up to him.

“Let’s see yer fishin’ license, Boy!” the Warden gasped.

With that, the boy pulled out his wallet and gave the Game Warden a valid fishing license.

“Well, son,” said the Game Warden. “You must be about as dumb as a box of rocks! You don’t have to run from me if you have a valid license!”

“Yes, sir,” replied the young guy. “But my friend back there, well, he don’t have one.”

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Not in my Fishing Hole

July 1, 2011 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

One Saturday morning he gets up early, dresses quietly, gets his lunch made, puts on his long johns, grabs his dog and goes to the garage to hook up his boat to the truck and down to the driveway he goes

Coming out of his garage the rain is pouring down: it is like a torrential downpour. There is snow and sleet mixed in with the rain. The wind is blowing at over 50mph.

Minutes later he returns to the garage. He comes back into the house. Turns the TV to the weather channel and he finds it is going to be very bad weather all day long, so he puts his boat back in the garage, quietly undresses and slips back into bed.

There he cuddles up to his wife’s back, now with a different anticipation and whispers, “The weather out there is terrible”. To which she sleepily replies, “Yeah, can you believe my stupid husband is out fishing in it?”

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Take The Bait

July 1, 2011 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

It was a cold winter day, when an old man walked out onto a frozen lake, cut a hole in the ice, dropped in his fishing line and began waiting for a fish to bite.

He was there for almost an hour without even a nibble when a young boy walked out onto the ice, cut a hole in the ice not too far from the old man and dropped in his fishing line. It only took about a minute and WHAM! a Largemouth Bass hit his hook and the boy pulled in the fish.

The old man couldn’t believe it but figured it was just luck. But, the boy dropped in his line and again within just a few minutes pulled in another one.

This went on and on until finally the old man couldn’t take it any more since he hadn’t caught a thing all this time.

He went to the boy and said, “Son, I’ve been here for over an hour without even a nibble. You have been here only a few minutes and have caught about half a dozen fish! How do you do it?”

The boy responded, “Roo raf roo reep ra rums rrarm.”

“What was that?” the old man asked.

Again the boy responded, “Roo raf roo reep ra rums rarrm.”

“Look,” said the old man, “I can’t understand a word you are saying.”

So, the boy spit into his hand and said, “You have to keep the worms warm!”

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A Fishy Story

July 1, 2011 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

Two avid fishermen go on a fishing trip. They rent all the equipment: the reels, the rods, the wading suits, the rowboat, the car, and even a cabin in the woods. They spend a fortune.

The first day they go fishing, but they don’t catch anything. The same thing happens on the second day, and on the third day. It goes on like this until finally, on the last day of their vacation, one of the men catches a fish.

As they’re driving home they’re really depressed. One guy turns to the other and says, “Do you realize that this one lousy fish we caught cost us fifteen hundred dollars?”

The other guy says, “Wow! It’s a good thing we didn’t catch any more!”

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Tales From The Riverbank

December 10, 2009 by  
Filed under General Fishing Tips

Among the most popular kinds of fishing, the sedate afternoon on the riverbank has to be one of the most enduring. For many people it is fishing the way it should be. Quiet, usually fairly isolated and relaxing, with only a few people there. There are many reasons why this is a good way to enjoy fishing. For one thing, the optimum conditions for fishing necessitate a certain amount of quiet. If things are too noisy, then fish are likely to avoid the area. If there are too many people there, then any fish who do stick around will be spoiled for choice over which bait to take.

But apart from the fact that it provides a better chance of catching something, the isolation of a quiet riverbank has other benefits for an afternoon’s fishing. We’ve all been Christmas shopping during a December weekend. It takes a very strong and determined person to do that and not come home feeling like they want to roll up into a ball and start sucking on their thumb. This is not something that you want from a fishing expedition, which should after all be sedate and pleasant.

Sitting on a riverbank is also pretty much as close as you can get to nature. There is nature flowing right in front of you, hopefully with a lot of nature swimming around in it. There is nature beneath your feet, and there should be some more behind you – riverbanks tend to be close to trees, in most cases. It really is one of the most relaxing pursuits that you can indulge in.

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